MOLYBDENUM

Molybdenum is not naturally found in its metallic form but is present in various oxidation states within minerals. Industrially, compounds of molybdenum find applications in high-pressure and high-temperature environments, as well as in pigments and catalysts. Its ability to withstand extreme temperatures without significant expansion or softening makes it valuable in industries requiring heat resistance, such as aircraft manufacturing, electrical components, and industrial machinery. Moreover, molybdenum is highly regarded in alloys for its exceptional resistance to corrosion and ease of welding. In stainless steel, for instance, it prevents the formation of chromium carbide at grain boundaries, enhancing its corrosion resistance. Despite being present in small amounts, molybdenum plays a critical role in various alloys, including stainless and tool steels, cast irons, and high-temperature superalloys, with an annual usage exceeding 43,000 tons as an alloying element.

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Oxide

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Electrodes

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